Installation

The Memory Project is a collection of interviews with Hungarian American immigrants who came to the U.S. after the 1956 Revolution and World War II. The interviews are published, with minimal editing, to the Memory Project visual history archive. Interviews last between 45 minutes to two hours, and in most cases, the interviewees have never before told their stories on camera. Our collection currently holds 85 interviews.

The Memory Project is one way these stories are passed on to the next generation and become part of the collective history of the Hungarian American community. During this special anniversary year, we have also created a video installation as a new way to share these personal stories with the community as a whole. 


Video Installation (Featured on Index.hu)

The video installation showcases five video projections based on excerpts of Memory Project interviews. The projections consist of multiple interviewees, one after another for 5-10 minutes, answering one of the following questions. The video then loops back to the beginning. These videos are in English and Hungarian with Hungarian subtitles.

1) What is your most vivid memory of the Revolution?

 

2) How did you escape Hungary in 1956?

3) What were your feelings when you crossed the border?

4) What was your first memory of America?

5) What does the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 mean to you personally?

 


Memory Project Germany 1956/2016

This 6-part video installation was created together with the Collegium Hungaricum Berlin for the 60th anniversary of the Hungarian Revolution. The exhibit ran from October 17 – November 30, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. Each video answers a specific question asked of all Memory Project participants. In Hungarian with German subtitles.

1) What is your most vivid memory of the Revolution?

 

2) How did you escape Hungary in 1956?

 

3) What were your feelings when you crossed the border?

4) What was your first memory of America?

5) What does the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 mean to you personally?

6) What does the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 mean to you personally?