Edith Kish Lauer

ALL MATERIAL: COPYRIGHT CALIFORNIA EUROPEAN CULTURAL INITIATIVE/MEMORY PROJECT

At the age of 14, Edith Kish Lauer witnessed the Revolution from her family’s balcony overlooking Moricz Zsigmond korter. Her entire family was involved in the Revolution: her mother worked at her local pharmacy helping wounded freedom fighters, her father and she worked side-by-side building barricades from the cobblestone streets, her older sister and she helped deliver messages across the square and gathered supplies from the pharmacy to help classmates make Molotov cocktails. Her family escaped in two waves in November 1956 and being reunited made their way to the US. Edith eventually married an American man and started her life as a dual citizen - proud Hungarian and enthusiastic American.

Interview conducted by Andrea Lauer Rice and Réka Pigniczky in Cleveland, Ohio in May of 2015.
NOTE: The interviewer, Andrea, is her daughter

Timecodes:

Life under communism
0:26-5:56

Unique work experience
6:10-8:38

Arrival to the US
8:39-8:57

Leaving Hungary at 14
9:02-9:29

Decision to leave
9:32-10:15

1956 – “Bird’s eye view of the Revolution”
10:17-14:25

Why did you leave?
14:28-15:36

Vivid memories of 1956
15:41-20:54

Leaving Grandparents behind
21:00-22:32

Family escape
22:40-31:23

Unforgettable people/memories of 1956
31:30-33:44

Spirit of 1956
33:50-36:20

**”Anything is possible if enough people untie to fight for it.”
“Showing the true face of communism.”

Impact of the Revolution on her life
36”24-37:40

Expectations / Realities of life in the US
37:45-43:41

Immigrant life for DPs vs 56ers
43:43-45:02

Remembering the Revolution through the years
45:05-47:27

Life in the US
47:35-52:54

Dual Identity
53:00-56:10

**“Having a dual identity is a tremendous enrichment.”

Hungarian American community / Family life
56:10-58:00

Marrying an American
58:10-1:08:48

Hungarian Identity
1:08:50-1:10:10

**good quote – “I am the citizen and daughter of a nation…”

Hungarian American
1:10:10-1:11:17

Why are you doing this interview?
1:11:21-1:11:44

Oral History advertisement
1:12:00

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